Category : Mia the Math Magician

An Ordering Numbers Worksheet

Ordering numbers

Mia the Math Magician

Mia the Math Magician has a special skill – she is a wizard with mathematics!

Learning to order numbers

Are your students or children learning to put numbers in a sequential order? If you’re a teacher or a homeschool parent, or if you’d like your kids to get some extra practice with their numbers after they return home from classes in the afternoon, here’s a worksheet that you can use to show your children how numbers are counted in order, and that for any given number you can find the number that comes before or after that number. After showing them how ordering numbers works, have them complete the practice questions on the activity sheet.

Speak numbers aloud while practicing counting

Remember that it is helpful for children to speak numbers aloud when practicing counting or ordering numbers. By doing so, your children will be helping their minds memorize the information that they are processing.

Be sure to have patience with your children or students as they are learning to count… this is a skill that they will eventually master, so there is no need to rush them or force them to adapt a pace that is uncomfortable for them. Let them have fun with numbers and counting as they are learning, and instill in them a love of mathematics!

Fill In the Blanks Addition Puzzle

Solving a math puzzle

Mia the Math Magician

Mia the Math Magician has a special skill – she is a wizard with mathematics!

Add up numbers to fill in the blanks

In this free downloadable and printable worksheet, your first and second grade students can answer the math problems on the page to find what letters should be entered into the dashes in the word below the puzzle. Once all of the math questions have been solved properly, you will find the answer to the question: what is Mia the Math Magician’s very favorite time of day? The answer should not be a surprise to anyone!

I hope that Mia the Math Magician’s favorite time of day is also your favorite time of day!

A More Than or Less Than Math Story

Clover the math dog

Mia the Math Magician

Mia the Math Magician has a special skill – she is a wizard with mathematics!

Learning to compare number values

Here’s a free math story featuring Mia the Math Magician and her dog friend Clover. Download, print, and then read the story to your children or students, or have them read the story aloud to you or in front of the class if they are able to do so. When you encounter a box posing the question more or less, have your students determine the answer to the question. It will take some counting and some skills with comparing numeric values to do so.

English grammar rules for comparing values

In this story, we’re using the terms more and less to help children distinguish whether a number’s value is more than or less than another number’s value. So for example, if there are 6 cats and 5 dogs, you would indicate that the number 6 is more than 5, and the number 5 is less than 6.

Grammatically speaking, it is correct to say that there are more cats than dogs, and that there are fewer dogs than cats; as such, depending on how you phrase the “More or Less?” question to your child or student, you may be asking them to answer the question in a way that is grammatically incorrect (“there are less cats than dogs” is incorrect grammar). I think that this is okay at this stage in your child’s education – we’re concentrating on teaching children the math skill of how to distinguish which values are greater than or less than other values. If you’d like to take the extra step to teach them proper grammar as well, you can do so, but this is also something that they will learn in future language arts lessons.

Have fun reading and comparing numbers!

Counting to 20 Connect the Dots

Counting at the Circus

Mia the Math Magician

Mia the Math Magician has a special skill – she is a wizard with mathematics!

Learning to count to 20

Here’s a free connect-the-dots worksheet featuring Mia the Math Magician. Have your children or students complete this activity, answer the simple question (what have they drawn after connecting the dots?) and then they can color the picture in with colored pencils or crayons.

It’s not hard to count to 20 using this worksheet – the numbers are in a clear progression from 1 to 20. Feel free to help your child while he or she is learning to count the sequence of numbers.

Speaking the numbers aloud

As your child is counting to 20 using the connect-the-dots, have them speak the numbers aloud while they are counting from dot to dot. That will help him or her to memorize the numbers and get the sequence of numbers into his or her head.

Tens and Ones Digits with Mia the Math Magician

Ringmaster at the circus

Mia the Math Magician

Mia the Math Magician has a special skill – she is a wizard with mathematics!

Here are two free circus-themed worksheets to use with your students or children to teach them that two-digit numbers are composed of a tens digit and a ones digit with the help of Mia the Math Magician. Today Mia is working as the ringmaster of a Big Top Circus.

These worksheets include two different activities that you can use to demonstrate the concept of number place value: that units in different locations in the number have different values within the number itself. Specifically, these worksheets work with the tens digit and the ones digit in a two-digit number. In certain cases students will be presented with a single digit number, in which case there will be no tens digit indicated.

An introduction to place value

The first worksheet introduces the concept of tens and ones. If you’re completing these activities in a classroom or homeschool setting, take the time to explain the first example to your students, perhaps using a chalkboard and a whiteboard to draw the units and then to circle the objects that correspond to the tens digit in the number with chalk. Then have the students in the class complete the remainder of the problem sheet on their own. Help them if they need extra assistance in understanding the concept.

How many tens and ones?

The second worksheet is full of problems for which students are given two-digit numbers and must indicate which digit is the tens digit and which is the ones digit.

First Grade Common Core Standards for Mathematics

This lesson falls under standard 1.NBT.2, Number and Operations in Base 10, for first grade common core mathematics skills:

Understand that the two digits of a two-digit number represent amounts of tens and ones. Understand the following as special cases:

  • a. 10 can be thought of as a bundle of ten ones — called a “ten.”
  • b. The numbers from 11 to 19 are composed of a ten and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones.
  • c. The numbers 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 refer to one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine tens (and 0 ones).

Teach addition with Mia the Math Magician

Teach addition with Mia the Math Magician

Mia the Math Magician

Mia the Math Magician has a special skill – she is a wizard with mathematics!

Here are two free worksheets that you can complete with your children or students so that they may learn to add numbers together.

Learning basic addition

The first worksheet provides an introduction to the concept of addition, demonstrating that addition is achieved by adding together groups of units. If you are a teacher or a parent showing children how to achieve addition, it might take a bit of work for your students to understand the logical concept behind the practice. To help demonstrate the concept of addition, you can use collections of real objects (like coins, buttons or crayons) to show that when you add one group of objects to another group of objects, you get a larger group of objects that equals the “added up” collection of objects – the sum.

Addition matching worksheet

The second activity is a problem page that your children can complete once they understand how to add up numbers using numerals. Have them complete the addition problems on the page, then draw a line from the problem to the number of objects that corresponds to that problem’s answer. For example, if the answer to the math problem is 5, have them draw a line from that math problem to the group of five objects found elsewhere on the page.

Further practice with addition

Once your children understand the concept of addition, you can have them complete this worksheet for extra adding practice. If they enjoy addition and want further practice, you can also have them complete these addition number wheels.

Kindergarten Common Core Standards for Mathematics

This lesson falls under standard K.OA.1 for kindergarten common core mathematics skills:

Represent addition and subtraction with objects, fingers, mental images, drawings, sounds (e.g., claps), acting out situations, verbal explanations, expressions, or equations.

Counting to 100 with Mia the Math Magician

Count to 100 with Mia the Math Magician

Mia the Math Magician

Mia the Math Magician has a special skill – she is a wizard with mathematics!

Counting to 100

Here are two free worksheets that you can do with your children or students to practice counting to one hundred.

The numbers from 1 to 100

The first activity is a simple chart with numbers from 1 to 100. Your child can simply read the words, and understand how the numbers are grouped into tens… with a “0 to 9” for all of the numbers in the group of 10. If you’re using this worksheet in a classroom setting, you can have individual students read the numbers in each group of 10.

There is a challenge activity on this page – have your children or students count by twos on the same worksheet. If they color in every second box yellow (the 2, the 4, the 6, the 8, and so on) they will be able to use the yellow numbers as a guide to count by 2 all the way up to 100.

To fulfill the Kindergarten Common Core standard for counting to 100, you can also practice counting by tens. The same method can be used in this case – color each tenth number in orange – 10, 20, 30, 40, and so on – and then have your students count by 10 all the way to 100.

Counting fill-in-the-blanks

The second activity is a fill-in-the-blanks worksheet for numbers from 1 to 100. Some of the numbers are missing… have your children or students fill out the missing numbers on the worksheet.

Kindergarten Common Core Standards for Mathematics

This lesson falls under standard K.CC.1 for kindergarten common core mathematics skills:

Count to 100 by ones and by tens.

Count and Draw with Mia the Math Magician

Counting and drawing with Mia the Math Magician

Mia the Math Magician

Mia the Math Magician has a special skill – she is a wizard with mathematics!

A counting and drawing activity

Here is a free activity that you can do with your children or students to practice counting numbers and associating a number of units with numerals.

If you’re a parent or a homeschool teacher, read the story to your children, or help your children to read the story aloud if they are already literate. Mia the Math Magician will relate a story to your children about to hungry bluebirds searching for food. As you read the story, your child should draw in the boxes the number of objects posed by Mia (so for example, when asked to draw two little bluebirds, your child can draw two birds in the boxes with a blue crayon).

If you’re a schoolteacher, you can also use this exercise in the classroom. Read the story aloud to your students, or pick students in the classroom to read the story to the rest of the class. When you reach a point where you are asked to draw something inside one of the boxes on the page, give your students time to draw inside the boxes. Then, continue the story until you are finished.

Kindergarten Common Core Standards for Mathematics

This lesson falls under standard K.CC.5 for kindergarten common core mathematics skills:

Count to answer “how many?” questions about as many as 20 things arranged in a line, a rectangular array, or a circle, or as many as 10 things in a scattered configuration; given a number from 1–20, count out that many objects.

Greater Than and Less Than with Mia the Math Magician

Greater than and less than with Mia the Math Magician

Mia the Math Magician

Mia the Math Magician has a special skill – she is a wizard with mathematics!

Greater than and less than

Greater than (also known as more than) and less than are two essential skills to learn on the road to becoming a Math Magician. Also important is equal to, a concept that Mia the Math Magician will teach in a future lesson!

Teach your children or students the concepts of greater than and less than, and then have them fill out these two free worksheets to help them to really understand the concepts. It might also be fun to play more than or less than games with your kids with items you have around the house – balls, toys, coins, or buttons. Create two piles of objects, one greater than the other, and ask which pile is greater than the other pile? Then ask, which pile is less than the other pile? Your children will soon understand that, unless the piles are of equal size, when one group of objects is greater than another group, that other group is less than the first group.

Kindergarten Common Core Standards for Mathematics

This lesson falls under standard K.CC.6 for kindergarten common core mathematics skills:

Identify whether the number of objects in one group is greater than, less than, or equal to the number of objects in another group, e.g., by using matching and counting strategies.

Numbers Copywork with Mia the Math Magician

Numbers copywork with Mia the Math Magician

Mia the Math Magician

Mia the Math Magician has a special skill – she is a wizard with mathematics!

Numerals copywork

Once your children or students have learned how to count to ten, they will want to have some practice with the numbers they have learned. Here are two free worksheets that you can give to your children to practice writing the numbers from 1 to 10 (plus 0) using manuscript handwriting. Have them try their best to control their hand while writing the numbers. It also helps to speak the numbers aloud while printing them to help to remember the numerals and associate their shapes with their names.

If your students would like extra numbers writing practice, there are more free activities in the Manuscript Handwriting section of this site.

Kindergarten Common Core Standards for Mathematics

This lesson falls under standard K.CC.3 for kindergarten common core mathematics skills:

Write numbers from 0 to 20. Represent a number of objects with a written numeral 0-20 (with 0 representing a count of no objects).