Passport to the World

A boy with some international flags

Open your students’ minds

If you want your students to grow to be accepting and understanding of others, it’s a good idea to teach them about different people, places, languages and cultures. Do it early in their educational careers, before they’ve started to form stereotypes or negative impressions about people of different races or religions.

If you’re completing a history unit, or even a math unit or a language unit, why not give it an international theme? It’s not hard to teach mathematics or science with an international twist – you can do so in conjunction with teaching your children how others live their lives in this huge world we share.

Explore the countries of the world

Here is a free student passport that you can give to your students at the beginning of the school year or semester when you are planning on studying different countries and cultures.

Instructions

  1. Download and print out, then photocopy and distribute a copy of the passport to all of the children in your class. Show your students how to assemble the passport to resemble a booklet.
  2. Have your students fill out the personal information on the first inside page of the passport – their names, genders, birthplaces and nationalities. They can glue or tape a picture of themselves into the passport or, if there are no photos of your students available, have them draw a picture of themselves in the photo box with crayons or colored pencils.
  3. Whenever you start to study a particular country or region, have your students choose a Visas page and draw an arrival stamp under the Entries column. Alternatively, if you have country-themed ink stamps, you can use those.
  4. Study the country of your choice. Have fun! Teach your students to respect the cultures of others, even if they are wildly different from their own.
  5. When you’ve finished studying your country, have your students create a departure stamp under the Departures column on the same page of the passport as they added their initial arrival stamp.

Language and culture activities

For third and fourth grade students, you can use this passport in conjuction with the free Mathbooking – France Journal math problems booklet, that features individual factoids about life in France with each question. For older students you can use this passport when playing the free Flags of the World matching game.

Bon voyage!

Mixminder on TPT

6 Responses to “Passport to the World”

  1. Coleen says:

    I love this idea. I will be revamping it for high schoolers. I can use this idea with my International Foods class. After they have completed a report/activity on a country they can get it stamped by me and move on to the next country! There are also other ways I can use this with my students to encourage self discovery.

  2. Thank you Coleen – I am glad that this will come in handy in your high school classroom!

    If you have any suggestions for ways that this could be altered to better serve older students, or any other comments, please let me know… I’d be glad to alter this one to suit your purposes, as if you have need of a certain version, there might be other teachers who could use it as well.

    Thanks again, and best of luck with your teaching.

  3. Carla Provost says:

    I love the design & the instructions of this passport. I will be using it for my Sunday School students as a Welcome Back to Sunday School event. Our town of Randolph, MA is the most diverse town in our state – even more than Boston ! A good number of people in our church are from different countries & this passport is a great tool to teach the Sunday School students that we have a whole world in our hands at church. 🙂

  4. Dorota says:

    Thank you for letting others use your work. The passport will be a great addition to our homeschooling geography project.

    • Thank you very much! I really appreciate the kind words, and I am very pleased that the passport will help you with your homeschooling geography lessons. I hope you and your family have a wonderful year of homeschooling!

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