Category : Learning to Count

Winter Counting by Twos Connect the Dots

Counting by twos connect the dotsHalloween is over, Thanksgiving has come and gone. That means that the winter season is upon us, with Christmas, Hannukah, Kwanzaa, the winter solstice, and a great number of other wonderful reasons to celebrate are coming up!

For the next several weeks we’re going to be featuring a number of different holiday-themed lesson plans, worksheets and activities on the Mixminder site. So let’s start it off with a fun connect-the-dots activity featuring a fun snowman. I’d like to say “have your students connect the dots to find out what the picture is”… but okay… it’s pretty obvious it’s a snowman!

Counting by 2s

This connect-the-dots activity is designed to help your students practice counting by twos. The best way for your children to do this is to say the names of the numbers as they connect the dots… so, for example, “2… 4… 6… 8.” In this manner will your students start to learn and understand the concept behind counting by twos, and also start to remember the pattern of numbers starting with 2.

If you live in a snowy place, I hope you get a good fresh snowfall in the near future! And that it doesn’t equate to a bunch of snow shoveling for you or your loved ones…

First Grade Common Core Standards for Mathematics

This lesson falls under standard 1.OA.5, Operations & Algebraic Thinking, for first grade common core mathematics skills:

Relate counting to addition and subtraction (e.g., by counting on 2 to add 2).

An Ordering Numbers Worksheet

Ordering numbers

Mia the Math Magician

Mia the Math Magician has a special skill – she is a wizard with mathematics!

Learning to order numbers

Are your students or children learning to put numbers in a sequential order? If you’re a teacher or a homeschool parent, or if you’d like your kids to get some extra practice with their numbers after they return home from classes in the afternoon, here’s a worksheet that you can use to show your children how numbers are counted in order, and that for any given number you can find the number that comes before or after that number. After showing them how ordering numbers works, have them complete the practice questions on the activity sheet.

Speak numbers aloud while practicing counting

Remember that it is helpful for children to speak numbers aloud when practicing counting or ordering numbers. By doing so, your children will be helping their minds memorize the information that they are processing.

Be sure to have patience with your children or students as they are learning to count… this is a skill that they will eventually master, so there is no need to rush them or force them to adapt a pace that is uncomfortable for them. Let them have fun with numbers and counting as they are learning, and instill in them a love of mathematics!

Counting to 20 Connect the Dots

Counting at the Circus

Mia the Math Magician

Mia the Math Magician has a special skill – she is a wizard with mathematics!

Learning to count to 20

Here’s a free connect-the-dots worksheet featuring Mia the Math Magician. Have your children or students complete this activity, answer the simple question (what have they drawn after connecting the dots?) and then they can color the picture in with colored pencils or crayons.

It’s not hard to count to 20 using this worksheet – the numbers are in a clear progression from 1 to 20. Feel free to help your child while he or she is learning to count the sequence of numbers.

Speaking the numbers aloud

As your child is counting to 20 using the connect-the-dots, have them speak the numbers aloud while they are counting from dot to dot. That will help him or her to memorize the numbers and get the sequence of numbers into his or her head.

Counting to 100 with Mia the Math Magician

Count to 100 with Mia the Math Magician

Mia the Math Magician

Mia the Math Magician has a special skill – she is a wizard with mathematics!

Counting to 100

Here are two free worksheets that you can do with your children or students to practice counting to one hundred.

The numbers from 1 to 100

The first activity is a simple chart with numbers from 1 to 100. Your child can simply read the words, and understand how the numbers are grouped into tens… with a “0 to 9” for all of the numbers in the group of 10. If you’re using this worksheet in a classroom setting, you can have individual students read the numbers in each group of 10.

There is a challenge activity on this page – have your children or students count by twos on the same worksheet. If they color in every second box yellow (the 2, the 4, the 6, the 8, and so on) they will be able to use the yellow numbers as a guide to count by 2 all the way up to 100.

To fulfill the Kindergarten Common Core standard for counting to 100, you can also practice counting by tens. The same method can be used in this case – color each tenth number in orange – 10, 20, 30, 40, and so on – and then have your students count by 10 all the way to 100.

Counting fill-in-the-blanks

The second activity is a fill-in-the-blanks worksheet for numbers from 1 to 100. Some of the numbers are missing… have your children or students fill out the missing numbers on the worksheet.

Kindergarten Common Core Standards for Mathematics

This lesson falls under standard K.CC.1 for kindergarten common core mathematics skills:

Count to 100 by ones and by tens.

Count and Draw with Mia the Math Magician

Counting and drawing with Mia the Math Magician

Mia the Math Magician

Mia the Math Magician has a special skill – she is a wizard with mathematics!

A counting and drawing activity

Here is a free activity that you can do with your children or students to practice counting numbers and associating a number of units with numerals.

If you’re a parent or a homeschool teacher, read the story to your children, or help your children to read the story aloud if they are already literate. Mia the Math Magician will relate a story to your children about to hungry bluebirds searching for food. As you read the story, your child should draw in the boxes the number of objects posed by Mia (so for example, when asked to draw two little bluebirds, your child can draw two birds in the boxes with a blue crayon).

If you’re a schoolteacher, you can also use this exercise in the classroom. Read the story aloud to your students, or pick students in the classroom to read the story to the rest of the class. When you reach a point where you are asked to draw something inside one of the boxes on the page, give your students time to draw inside the boxes. Then, continue the story until you are finished.

Kindergarten Common Core Standards for Mathematics

This lesson falls under standard K.CC.5 for kindergarten common core mathematics skills:

Count to answer “how many?” questions about as many as 20 things arranged in a line, a rectangular array, or a circle, or as many as 10 things in a scattered configuration; given a number from 1–20, count out that many objects.

Learning to Count with Mia the Math Magician

Teach counting with Mia the Math Magician

Mia the Math Magician

Mia the Math Magician has a special skill – she is a wizard with mathematics!

Counting to 10

This is the first of a series of lessons where Mia the Math Magician will introduce your students or children to mathematics. Use today’s free downloadable worksheets to teach your child how to count to ten. The activities include a primer about counting to ten, a story to read where your child can interact by counting the items Mia sees on her walk, and a worksheet that your child can use to practice counting items and writing the number of items counted on the page.

There will be more Mia the Math Magician lessons coming… Mia loves mathematics and would be more than happy to help you teach the students in your classroom all about counting, addition, subtraction, time, and the special power of numbers.

Counting by Threes

Objective

To teach you child to learn to count numbers by three (3, 6, 9, 12, 15).

Goal

At the end of the lesson your child will be able to count to 15 in multiples of 3.

Download the counting by threes worksheet

Time requirement

20 minutes.

Grade level

Kindergarten and first grade.

Introductory activity

  1. Have your child bring you 15 objects of the same type. Examples include: 15 coins, 15 pebbles, 15 stuffed toys, 15 figurines.
  2. Sit down with your child and show him or her how to group objects into threes. Group all 15 objects into sets of three.
  3. Together with your child, count the objects group by group… 3, 6, 9, 12, 15.

Challenge

If your child or student has learned how to count by threes, gather some more objects and teach them to count by threes to a higher number, such as 30 or 45.

Reinforcement activity

Print out the attached Counting by Threes worksheet. Ask your child to complete the worksheet by themselves. Tell them they must join the dots in the picture by counting by threes – have them read the numbers aloud as they complete the activity.

Evaluation

In order to see if your child has achieved the goal of this lesson, ask them to count from 0 to 15 by threes.

Counting by Twos

Objective

To teach you child to learn to count numbers by two (2, 4, 6, 8, 10).

Goal

At the end of the lesson your child will be able to count to 10 in multiples of 2.

Download the counting by twos worksheet

Time requirement

20 minutes.

Grade level

Kindergarten and first grade.

Introductory activity

  1. Have your child bring you 10 objects of the same type. Examples include: 10 shells, 10 balls, 10 dolls, 10 toy cars, or 10 pennies.
  2. Sit down with your child and show him or her how to group objects into pairs (you can teach your child the term ‘pair’) Group all 10 objects into pairs.
  3. Together with your child, count the objects pair by pair… 2, 4, 6, 8, 10. Explain to them how, when you count by twos, you skip every other number.

Challenge

If your child or student has learned how to count by twos, gather some more objects and teach them to count by twos to a higher number, such as 40 or 50.

Reinforcement activity

Print out the attached Counting by Twos worksheet. Ask your child to complete the worksheet by themselves. Tell them they must join the dots in the picture by counting by twos – have them say the numbers aloud as they complete the activity.

Evaluation

In order to see if your child has achieved the goal of this lesson, ask them to count from 0 to 10 by twos.

Counting from 7 to 10

Objective

To teach you child to learn to count the numbers from 7 to 10.

Goal

At the end of the lesson your child will be able to count the numbers 7, 8, 9 and 10 in succession, and be understand their proper order. After this lesson and the other counting lessons in this unit, your child should be able to count all the way up to 10.

Download the counting from 7 to 10 worksheet

Time requirement

20 minutes.

Grade level

Pre-Kindergarten and Kindergarten.

Introductory activity

  1. Take some food that your child likes (for example, M&Ms, grapes, or small cookies) an put them in a pile on the table.
  2. Mention that you’re going to teach your child to count to 10. If you’ve done the activity for teaching counting from 4 to 6, this lesson will be familiar, though you will not be using a number line to reinforce the numbers – the child will be remembering where the numbers go. That being said, you can start with a number line if you and your child would prefer.
  3. Starting with 1, count out a single piece of food. When you move on to two, count out two pieces of food – as in, “1, 2”. Continue with 3, 4, 5, and so on, all the way up to 10.
  4. When you have finished counting the food this way, your child may eat what you have counted – remember to re-count each number before the piece of food goes into your child’s mouth!
  5. Repeat the game again, or repeat the game at every mealtime… repetition over time is a great way for any student to learn different lessons.

Challenge

If your child has grasped the concept of counting from 1 to 10, try teaching them to count all the way up to number 20. You can use similar methods as in the described lesson.

Reinforcement activity

Print out the attached counting worksheet and ask your child to complete the worksheet by him or herself. Feel free to help your child if they get stuck or ask any questions about counting or numbers.

Evaluation

In order to see if your child has achieved the goal of this lesson, continue to count things in nature – leaves, stones, cars, people, dogs, cats. Find any opportunity that you can to teach your child about counting, and to show your child that there are plenty of things in nature that can be counted!

Counting from 4 to 6

Objective

To teach you child to learn to count the numbers from 4 to 6.

Goal

At the end of the lesson your child will be able to count the numbers 4, 5 and 6 in succession, and be understand their proper order. They should also understand that these numbers follow the numbers from 1 to 3.

Download the counting from 4 to 6 worksheet

Time requirement

20 minutes.

Grade level

Pre-Kindergarten and Kindergarten.

Introductory activity

  1. Take a piece of paper. Along the line draw the numbers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6.
  2. Take six pieces of something your child likes to eat (M&Ms, raisins, or Goldfish crackers, for example) and show them to your child. Tell your child you’re going to teach him or her how to count to six.
  3. With your child, lay out the first piece food onto the paper with your number line. As you lay out each piece of food, say the number, and have your child repeat the number.
  4. As you lay down the second piece of food, say the first number (one) first; then follow up with the number two.
  5. Repeat this process counting all the way up to six, so that you always repeat the previous numbers in the list before you count the next number.
  6. When you’re done, your child can eat the food that you’ve counted – make sure you count each piece as your child pops it into his or her mouth! Feel free to repeat the game (if your child’s tummy isn’t too full).

Challenge

If your child has sufficiently grasped the concept of counting from 1 to 6, move on to the lesson to teach them to count from 7 until 10 (all the way up to 10).

Reinforcement activity

Print out the attached counting worksheet and ask your child to complete the worksheet by him or herself. Feel free to help your child if they get stuck or ask any questions about counting or numbers.

Evaluation

In order to see if your child has achieved the goal of this lesson, get six of the same type of object (sea shells, rocks, toys or coins) and have them count them for you. Then, lay down two objects, five objects, three objects, and so on, and ask them to count how many you have.