Numbers and Shapes Subtraction Wheels

Subtraction wheels for even numbers

Here is a free worksheet that you can download and hand out to your students for some extra practice with subtraction. Using this subtraction number wheel worksheet can help to reinforce the concept that numbers are made up of units. It might make for a good work-at-your-desk classroom or homeschool activity, or can even be used as a test to see how your kids are progressing with their subtraction skills.

This worksheet can continue the lessons learned in the beginner Subtracting Shapes from Numbers worksheet. With these number wheels your children or students can have more practice subtracting shapes from numbers, and more familiarity with the concept of subtraction in general.

The number of shapes within the center of each number wheel are even numbers.

For this activity, children are asked to write their answers in the form of numbers (printed numerals). However, if you like, they can also write their answers in the form of a total number of shapes – they may not have space to do this on the math worksheet, but if you are using math journals as part of your school or homeschool curriculum these can be used for answering the questions.

Numbers and Shapes Addition Wheels

Addition wheels for odd numbers

Below you will find a free worksheet that you can download and hand out to your students for some extra practice adding together numbers and shapes. Using this particular addition worksheet will help to reinforce the concept that numbers are made up of units. It might make for a good work-at-your-desk classroom or homeschool activity, or can even be used as a test to see how your kids are progressing with their adding skills.

This worksheet can continue the lessons learned in the beginner Adding Shapes and Numbers worksheet. With these number wheels your children or students will get more practice adding shapes and numbers together, and more familiarity with addition in general.

The number of shapes within the center of each number wheel are odd numbers – for a future version I’ll create a sheet with even numbers of shapes within the middle of each wheel.

For this activity, children are asked to write their answers in the form of numbers (printed numerals). However, if you like, they can also write their answers in the form of a total number of shapes – they may not have space to do this on the math worksheet, but if you are using math journals as part of your school or homeschool curriculum these can be used for answering the questions.

Subtracting Shapes from Numbers

Subtracting shapes from numbers

Here’s a free downloadable worksheet that you can use in your home or classroom to teach subtraction to your children or students. With this mathematics activity your students will be subtracting different shapes from different numerals to come up with the answers to the math problems.

In this activity, children are asked to write their answers in the form of numbers (printed numerals). However, if you like, they can also write their answers by drawing a number of shapes that equals the answer to the math question – they may not have space to do this on the math worksheet, but if you are using math journals as part of your school or homeschool curriculum these can be used for answering the questions.

Teaching subtraction with shapes

Using this particular subtraction activity can help you to teach subtraction to your class as it reinforces the concept that numbers are made up of units. For each problem students are presented with a numeral that a child then needs to use to subtract a collection of individual units equaling a number as the final answer. Students will need to understand the way the numerals and the number of units correlate in order to solve each problem.

If you are using this worksheet as part of a public or private school curriculum, you might choose to have your children complete the problems individually and then work through them together on the blackboard or on a whiteboard in front of the classroom. Together you can start with the numeral and then “count down the shapes” in unison until arriving upon the answer.

Adding Numbers and Shapes

Adding shapes and numbers

Here’s a free downloadable worksheet that you can use in your home or classroom to teach addition to your children or students. With this mathematics activity your students will be adding together numbers and different shapes to come up with a final answer.

For this activity, children are asked to write their answers in the form of numbers (printed numerals). However, if you like, they can also write their answers in the form of a total number of shapes – they may not have space to do this on the math worksheet, but if you are using math journals as part of your school or homeschool curriculum these can be used for answering the questions.

Teaching addition with shapes

Using this particular addition worksheet can help you to teach addition as it reinforces the concept that numbers are made up of units. On one hand, you have a numeral that a child then needs to add to a collection of individual units adding up to a number. Most kids will start with the unit on the left hand side of the equation and then count the number of shapes on the right hand side of the equation until they reach the answer to the math problem.

If you’re using this worksheet as part of a public or private school curriculum, you might want to have your children complete the problems and then work through them together on the blackboard or on a whiteboard in front of the classroom. Together you can start with the numeral and then “count the shapes” in unison until arriving upon the answer.

Mining for Shapes Math Craft Workshop

Mining for shapes

Teaching shapes and sizes to your kids

Here’s another fun and easy craft for your students to put together and either paste in their math journals or hang up as a decoration on the wall of the classroom, available here as a free download.

Lately my son has become a big fan of the game Minecraft. Playing Minecraft is a little bit like playing with LEGO bricks on your computer – you have the ability to create anything your little brain can imagine. One of the things my son loves the most about Minecraft is the ability to go exploring in caves and crevices deep underground and finding gold, diamonds, and lapis lazuli. It is a fun and creative outlet for his imagination.

My son’s love of Minecraft inspired me to design this craft. With this activity your kids can go “mining for shapes”. Cut out the gems, the miners, the minecarts and the mining tools, and send your kids deep into the depths of the earth to find shapes of different sizes and colors. Then, fill the minecarts with the precious stones according to the labels written on the cart. If the label reads “triangle”, fill that cart only with triangle-shaped gems. If the label reads “four”, fill the cart with gems that have four sides; squares, trapezoids and diamonds. Then your students can create a “mining scene” to put on the wall of the classroom, or if you’re doing this at home with your kids, why not tack it to the wall or place it on the fridge with magnets?

Math Craft Workshops

If you’re a teacher or parent teaching mathematics to your students or children, why not do it in a fun and creative way? That way, as they grow older, they will retain the notion that they can have fun while doing math. Math craft workshops are places where kids can learn left-brained stuff in a right-brained environment.

Math crafts can be completed in a classroom setting, or by kids at home working in their math journals or doing Mathbooking (a creative cross between mathematics and scrapbooking). As they’re cutting, pasting and coloring, they’ll also be adding, subtracting and learning about numbers.

I hope that your kids enjoy this craft! I know my son’s eyes lit up when he saw all of the different colored gems.