Category : Learning Numbers

The Many Uses of Morning Work

Do you use morning work in your classroom? I love morning work. It really helps students to stay focused as everyone else files into the classroom. I also like to use them as bell work, in case math isn’t the first class of the day. It helps students to stay focused between different subjects.

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I’m using my morning work pages with my children as exit tickets to use their electronic devices this summer. It keeps them focused and prevents the summer slide for math. I know lots of parents worry about reading in the summer, but sometimes they forget to reinforce math. I understand, there are so many things we as parents have to worry about. That is why I like these pages, you can half them to save on paper and also just to save on implementation. It’s just enough math to help your children review the skills.

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I also like the ‘too easy’ ‘too hard’ or ‘just right’ on the bottom because then you can see how your children or students feel about that particular math concept. My daughter had fun coloring the black and white graphics when she was done too!

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These morning work printables have a great format that will enable your students to work on them by themselves. This will help you free up time for last minute lesson prep. They also work well for homework. Low stress for your kids’ parents too!

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I love these input/output problems. My daughter didn’t realize that each one was different based on multiplication, division, etc. So it was nice to see her solve for the correct answer.
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I mentioned earlier that I used these as exit tickets in the summer, but you can use these as exit tickets during the school year too! The half-sized pages are just long enough to push your students to achieve a little bit more work before they go to recess or get to do another activity.

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And hey, sometimes pups have to get into the action of morning work, especially in the summer!

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To check out my morning work packets click on the following links:
First Grade Morning Work
Second Grade Morning Work
Third Grade Morning Work
Fourth Grade Morning Work
Fifth Grade Morning Work

Valentine’s Day Color by Numbers

Valentine's Day Color by Numbers

Yvonne writes: I hope everyone is having a wonderful new year.  I can’t believe that February is almost here!  I really dislike the expression, time flies… but it truly does.  

Valentine’s Day is almost upon us.  I am sure you are getting ready for the coming weeks by putting together an assortment of different fun activities for your class.  I thought I’d help you out with your planning by making a Valentine’s Day freebie.  So here’s an activity that I made especially for Cupids for Cancer!

Cupids for Cancer

Cupids for Cancer is a wonderful cause where schools collect healthy snacks for the children in their local children’s hospital to eat while they are on site for treatment.  I love how this cause makes it fun for the schoolchildren who are collecting food; the kids really get into the activity, gathering individually wrapped healthy snacks for the young patients in the hospital and participating in special themed days, like “Rockin’ My Pink Socks Day” and “Have a Heart Hat Day”. It is a fantastic cause.

Happy Valentine’s Day!

I hope your students have fun with the worksheet, and that you and your class have a wonderful Valentine’s Day!

An Ordering Numbers Worksheet

Ordering numbers

Mia the Math Magician

Mia the Math Magician has a special skill – she is a wizard with mathematics!

Learning to order numbers

Are your students or children learning to put numbers in a sequential order? If you’re a teacher or a homeschool parent, or if you’d like your kids to get some extra practice with their numbers after they return home from classes in the afternoon, here’s a worksheet that you can use to show your children how numbers are counted in order, and that for any given number you can find the number that comes before or after that number. After showing them how ordering numbers works, have them complete the practice questions on the activity sheet.

Speak numbers aloud while practicing counting

Remember that it is helpful for children to speak numbers aloud when practicing counting or ordering numbers. By doing so, your children will be helping their minds memorize the information that they are processing.

Be sure to have patience with your children or students as they are learning to count… this is a skill that they will eventually master, so there is no need to rush them or force them to adapt a pace that is uncomfortable for them. Let them have fun with numbers and counting as they are learning, and instill in them a love of mathematics!

Tens and Ones Digits with Mia the Math Magician

Ringmaster at the circus

Mia the Math Magician

Mia the Math Magician has a special skill – she is a wizard with mathematics!

Here are two free circus-themed worksheets to use with your students or children to teach them that two-digit numbers are composed of a tens digit and a ones digit with the help of Mia the Math Magician. Today Mia is working as the ringmaster of a Big Top Circus.

These worksheets include two different activities that you can use to demonstrate the concept of number place value: that units in different locations in the number have different values within the number itself. Specifically, these worksheets work with the tens digit and the ones digit in a two-digit number. In certain cases students will be presented with a single digit number, in which case there will be no tens digit indicated.

An introduction to place value

The first worksheet introduces the concept of tens and ones. If you’re completing these activities in a classroom or homeschool setting, take the time to explain the first example to your students, perhaps using a chalkboard and a whiteboard to draw the units and then to circle the objects that correspond to the tens digit in the number with chalk. Then have the students in the class complete the remainder of the problem sheet on their own. Help them if they need extra assistance in understanding the concept.

How many tens and ones?

The second worksheet is full of problems for which students are given two-digit numbers and must indicate which digit is the tens digit and which is the ones digit.

First Grade Common Core Standards for Mathematics

This lesson falls under standard 1.NBT.2, Number and Operations in Base 10, for first grade common core mathematics skills:

Understand that the two digits of a two-digit number represent amounts of tens and ones. Understand the following as special cases:

  • a. 10 can be thought of as a bundle of ten ones — called a “ten.”
  • b. The numbers from 11 to 19 are composed of a ten and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones.
  • c. The numbers 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 refer to one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine tens (and 0 ones).

Numbers Copywork with Mia the Math Magician

Numbers copywork with Mia the Math Magician

Mia the Math Magician

Mia the Math Magician has a special skill – she is a wizard with mathematics!

Numerals copywork

Once your children or students have learned how to count to ten, they will want to have some practice with the numbers they have learned. Here are two free worksheets that you can give to your children to practice writing the numbers from 1 to 10 (plus 0) using manuscript handwriting. Have them try their best to control their hand while writing the numbers. It also helps to speak the numbers aloud while printing them to help to remember the numerals and associate their shapes with their names.

If your students would like extra numbers writing practice, there are more free activities in the Manuscript Handwriting section of this site.

Kindergarten Common Core Standards for Mathematics

This lesson falls under standard K.CC.3 for kindergarten common core mathematics skills:

Write numbers from 0 to 20. Represent a number of objects with a written numeral 0-20 (with 0 representing a count of no objects).

Manuscript Handwriting Number 0

Objective

To teach your child to write the number 0 by hand, and to recognize it as both 0 and ‘zero’.

Goal

At the end of the lesson your child will be able to write both the number 0 and the word ‘zero’.

Time requirement

15 minutes.

Grade level

First grade.

Learn number zero in Spanish

In Spanish, the number zero is cero.

If you’re interested in teaching your child a second language, go ahead and teach the foreign language word for the number zero at the same time that your child is learning how to count. Demonstrating that a word (or a number) has multiple meanings from the beginning can help children to understand that a single thing can have different names in different languages and start building a multilingual mindset.

Manuscript Handwriting Number 9

Objective

To teach your child to write the number 9 by hand, and to recognize it as both 9 and ‘nine’.

Goal

At the end of the lesson your child will be able to write both the number 9 and the word ‘nine’.

Time requirement

15 minutes.

Grade level

First grade.

Learn number nine in Spanish

In Spanish, the number nine is nueve.

If you’re interested in teaching your child a second language, go ahead and teach the foreign language word for the number nine at the same time that your child is learning how to count. Demonstrating that a word (or a number) has multiple meanings from the beginning can help children to understand that a single thing can have different names in different languages and start building a multilingual mindset.

Manuscript Handwriting Number 8

Objective

To teach your child to write the number 8 by hand, and to recognize it as both 8 and ‘eight’.

Goal

At the end of the lesson your child will be able to write both the number 8 and the word ‘eight’.

Time requirement

15 minutes.

Grade level

First grade.

Learn number eight in Spanish

In Spanish, the number eight is ocho.

If you’re interested in teaching your child a second language, go ahead and teach the foreign language word for the number eight at the same time that your child is learning how to count. Demonstrating that a word (or a number) has multiple meanings from the beginning can help children to understand that a single thing can have different names in different languages and start building a multilingual mindset.

Manuscript Handwriting Number 7

Objective

To teach your child to write the number 7 by hand, and to recognize it as both 7 and ‘seven’.

Goal

At the end of the lesson your child will be able to write both the number 7 and the word ‘seven’.

Time requirement

15 minutes.

Grade level

First grade.

Learn number seven in Spanish

In Spanish, the number seven is siete.

If you’re interested in teaching your child a second language, go ahead and teach the foreign language word for the number seven at the same time that your child is learning how to count. Demonstrating that a word (or a number) has multiple meanings from the beginning can help children to understand that a single thing can have different names in different languages and start building a multilingual mindset.

Manuscript Handwriting Number 6

Objective

To teach your child to write the number 6 by hand, and to recognize it as both 6 and ‘six’.

Goal

At the end of the lesson your child will be able to write both the number 6 and the word ‘six’.

Time requirement

15 minutes.

Grade level

First grade.

Learn number six in Spanish

In Spanish, the number six is seis.

If you’re interested in teaching your child a second language, go ahead and teach the foreign language word for the number six at the same time that your child is learning how to count. Demonstrating that a word (or a number) has multiple meanings from the beginning can help children to understand that a single thing can have different names in different languages and start building a multilingual mindset.